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common sports injuries
Knee
ITB Iliotibial Band Syndrome
Jumpers Knee
Medial Ligament Sprain
Lateral Ligament Sprain
Patella Pain Syndrome
Bakers Cyst
location
Hip pain and tightness down outside of your leg towards knee.
Patella Tendonitis; pain felt at base of kneecap
Inside/to mid line of body of the knee joint.  A tear or rupture of the MCL .
Outside/away from body line of the knee joint.  A tear or rupture of the LCL .
AKA Runners Knee  Pain that is gradually worsening ache at front of knee, then turns into stabbing sharp pain when you run, probably causes you to stop activity as pain is so intense.
Pain behind or at back of knee.
what why how
Iliotibial band often becomes tight if not stretched  regularly especially after exercise (hard training sessions or race).  Sudden increase in mileage or intensity or poor running form or some off road running on uneven surface can irritate the band (ITB)
The common symptoms include;  Pain at bottom and front of knee cap and when pressed pain is greater.  Aches after most movements and activities which can include walking.  The affected tendon may be inflamed and appear more swollen/puffy than the opposite side tendon.  Both the upper leg (Quads) and lower leg (Calf's) could be tight.
Pain is often felt on the inside of the knee along the joint line (injury is caused by twisting or impact on the outside of knee/opposite side).  Grade 1 Mild tenderness on inside of knee over ligament.  There is mild pain but no joint laxity or swelling.  Grade 2 Somewhat tender, with swelling there will also be some restricted movement especially to the side (when knee in bent position).  Grade 3 tear of the ligament, Pain can fluctuate and there is considerable joint laxity!  Knee will feel "wobbly or unstable".
Pain is often felt on the outside of the knee along the joint line (injury is caused by twisting or impact on the inside (mid line)of knee/opposite side).  Grade 1 Mild tenderness on inside of knee over ligament.  There is mild pain but no joint laxity or swelling.  Grade 2 Somewhat tender, with swelling there will also be some restricted movement especially to the side (when knee in bent position).  Grade 3 tear of the ligament, Pain can fluctuate and there is considerable joint laxity!  Knee will feel "wobbly or unstable".
Causes mainly by biomechanical imbalance; hip or feet can cause it!  Extra load on knee, tight quads and ITB, number of biomechanical factors!
Baker's cysts more often than not extended from knee arthritis or a cartilage (a meniscus) tear. Baker's cysts centers between the tendons of the medial head of the large calf muscle gastrocnemius and the semimbranosus.  The synovial sac of the knee joint can produce a posterior bulge, into the popliteal space behind the knee. When this bulge becomes large enough, it becomes palpable and cystic. Most Baker's cysts maintain this direct communication with the synovial of the knee, but sometimes, the new cyst pinches. A Baker's cyst will rupture and produce
treatment
Cut down both intensity and mileage in short term, and avoid running downhill.  Sports massage and mixture of compression, ice and stretching will help recovery.
What can you do? If there is swelling apply cold therapy (Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation).  Discontinue with all activity that irritates the injury.  Wear a hinged knee brace this will support the joint, particularly for grade 2 and 3 injuries.   Wear a heat retainer after the acute phase.  Visit a sports injury specialist. What can a Sports Injury Professional do?  The initial aim of a health professional will be to assess the extent of the damage. This can be carried out by applying a force to the inner surface of the knee joint and comparing its laxity to the good knee (varus knee test). In serious cases an MRI and/or X-Ray be necessary. Depending on the severity of the injury a number of treatment options are available; In grade 1 & 2 tears, conservative methods of treatment are usually preferred. These may need to be be carried out for up to 8 weeks and may include:Ultrasound or laser treatment Manual techniques such as massage Create rehabilitation program that will include strengthening and proprioceptive (balance) exercises. In grade 3 sprains (ruptures), particularly when other structures such as the ACL or PCL are damaged, surgery may be needed to prevent future instability.  What can a Sports Injury Professional do?T he initial aim of a health professional will be to assess the extent of the damage. This can be carried out by applying a force to the inner surface of the knee joint and comparing its laxity to the good knee (varus knee test). In serious cases an MRI and/or X-Ray be necessary. Depending on the severity of the injury a number of treatment options are available; In grade 1 & 2 tears, conservative methods of treatment are usually preferred. These may need to be be carried out for up to 8 weeks and may include:Ultrasound or laser treatment Manual techniques such as massage Create rehabilitation program that will include strengthening and proprioceptive (balance) exercises. In grade 3 sprains (ruptures), particularly when other structures such as the ACL or PCL are damaged, surgery may be needed to prevent future instability.
Stop running or cycling for number of days other activities can be pursued such as cross train or swimming, to keep fitness levels up without putting pressure on knee.  
It is very rare that the symptoms are actually coming from the cyst. In most cases, there is another disorder in the knee (arthritis, meniscal tear) that is causing the problem. Initial treatment should be directed at correcting the source of the increased fluid production. Often rest and leg elevation are all that is needed.
exercises
The "Pigeon pose" stretching exercise will help;  sit with legs apart, straight out ahead.  Turn to left and draw knee towards you, while your hands are positioned behind your neck, lean over towards your left leg as near to floor possible.  Hold for 3 seconds, return and relax repeat other side.  10 reps each side.
Note: seek sports therapist advice for treatment exercise recovery plan and consider a analysis of your posture for longer term correction.  Strengthen weak hip and glute muscles with lateral side-steps.  Loop a resistance band just above knees, spread feet and bend knees into a crouch then walk side ways for 10 steps.  Keep feet straight and aligned with upper body still.  Then change direction.  Future prevention may require change in running stride length and further strengthening of quads and glutes.  Medium term as part of rebuild and preventing relapse introducing cycling and hill running will strengthen and stop knee rolling inwards in addition to controlling hip and thigh movement.
Many activities can put strain on the knee, and cause pain in the case of Baker's cyst. Avoiding activities such as squatting, kneeling, heavy lifting, climbing, and even running can help prevent pain.  Soft tissue therapy can help relieve pain, and exercises such as stretching and strengthening of the quadriceps, hamstrings and ITB  and patellar ligament may help and improve long term.
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